Making history club

Historical Society_019Christian Balaban, age 10, builds a sod house for the Making History Club, which meets at the Edmond Historical Society every Thursday in June and July.

Today started extra early. I had a 7:30 a.m. date with the Edmond Board of Education. Some members of the board are not overly receptive to journalists in attendance. They call their board meetings “retreats.”

When I arrived, I got a few odd glances from some of the men of the board and mostly happy/excited looks from the ladies. There could be something to that, as I have heard rumors of disgruntled board members.

After the initial weird feeling of being somewhere I shouldn’t be, I rather enjoyed the meeting. It lasted for about four hours and they discussed some very important issues like drug testing, as well as the Open Meetings Act. Many of the board members took time to introduce themselves to me and chat for a few minutes. Overall, I was greatly impressed with the care and professionalism they showed.

I was never a fan of the administration at my high school, so it was refreshing to watch a board full of members who truly care about the students they are in charge of. Instead of trying to figure out how to deal with impossible teenagers, they approached matters from the stance of how best to help students, whether an issue of safety or academia.

After downloading the hours of video, I went and shot another couple of portraits. I did get to photograph some kiddos building model sod houses at the Historical Society. The houses were really cool.

Upon my return, the staff at the Sun gathered across the street for some root beer floats (woot!) and to see the updates to the printing facility. I’ve seen newspaper presses in action before, but they still amaze me. So much paper flying everywhere, turning and spinning and hopefully lining up correctly, so my photos don’t come out all screwed up.

One Response to Making history club

  1. Asher Griffin says:

    the edmond sun printer used to screw up everything with color.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Historical Society_019Christian Balaban, age 10, builds a sod house for the Making History Club, which meets at the Edmond Historical Society every Thursday in June and July.

Today started extra early. I had a 7:30 a.m. date with the Edmond Board of Education. Some members of the board are not overly receptive to journalists in attendance. They call their board meetings “retreats.”

When I arrived, I got a few odd glances from some of the men of the board and mostly happy/excited looks from the ladies. There could be something to that, as I have heard rumors of disgruntled board members.

After the initial weird feeling of being somewhere I shouldn’t be, I rather enjoyed the meeting. It lasted for about four hours and they discussed some very important issues like drug testing, as well as the Open Meetings Act. Many of the board members took time to introduce themselves to me and chat for a few minutes. Overall, I was greatly impressed with the care and professionalism they showed.

I was never a fan of the administration at my high school, so it was refreshing to watch a board full of members who truly care about the students they are in charge of. Instead of trying to figure out how to deal with impossible teenagers, they approached matters from the stance of how best to help students, whether an issue of safety or academia.

After downloading the hours of video, I went and shot another couple of portraits. I did get to photograph some kiddos building model sod houses at the Historical Society. The houses were really cool.

Upon my return, the staff at the Sun gathered across the street for some root beer floats (woot!) and to see the updates to the printing facility. I’ve seen newspaper presses in action before, but they still amaze me. So much paper flying everywhere, turning and spinning and hopefully lining up correctly, so my photos don’t come out all screwed up.

One Response to Making history club

  1. Asher Griffin says:

    the edmond sun printer used to screw up everything with color.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *